Self-repairing teeth could put an end to drill and fill

Self-repairing teeth could put an end to drill and fill

An audible sigh of relief swept across the nation this week as news emerged that scientists are on the brink of perfecting a technique to repair tooth decay without the need for drilling and fillings.

Electrically Accelerated and Enhanced Remineralisation (EAER) encourages teeth to repair themselves. The technique has been developed by the experts – or heroes, as some are calling them – at King’s College London.

EAER accelerates the natural movement of calcium and phosphate minerals into the damaged tooth, removing the need for drilling and fillings of resin or amalgam.

Professor Nigel Pitts, from the Dental Institute at King’s College London, said: “The way we treat teeth today is not ideal – when we repair a tooth by putting in a filling, that tooth enters a cycle of drilling and re-filling as, ultimately, each ‘repair’ fails.

“Not only is our device kinder to the patient and better for their teeth, but it’s expected to be at least as cost-effective as current dental treatments.”

The method can also be used to whiten teeth, he added.

Electrically Accelerated and Enhanced Remineralisation could be available within three years.

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